american psychological association

35 Percent of College Students Use Apps While Driving, Says Study

by nil | June 28th, 2011

June 28, 2011

A new study out from the University of Alabama at Birmingham indicates that one-third of college students use cell phone apps while they’re behind the wheel. The most surprising finding: Even students who’ve had cell-phone related accidents continue to use their mobile devices in the car.

The study looked at 93 college students all of whom owned a smartphone device such as a Blackberry or iPhone. Each student claimed to use apps on their phone at least four times a week, although 10 of these students had previously been involved in car crashes caused by their own distracted driving.

The study, which will be presented at the American Psychological Association Convention in D.C. this summer, found that 10 percent of students often or nearly always use mobile apps while driving, and that one-third say they use them sometimes.

“It’s astounding, scary,” said David Schwebel, the director of the UAB Youth Safety Lab that supervised the study, in an interview with Reuters. “Very little of this is urgent business. It’s socializing and entertainment.”

Lauren McCartney, a UAB student who worked on the study, told Reuters that the study has led her to conclude that smartphones need to be banned from use while driving.

Read more.

Do you use smartphone apps while driving even though you know the dangers of doing so? What’s the best way to discourage people from using their cell phones while driving?

If you or someone you know has been involved in an Alabama auto accident, the Alabama auto accident attorneys at Norris Injury Lawyers can help.